In response to The Times investigation, state Department of Health officials said they are making sweeping changes in the way they handle...

In response to The Times investigation, state Department of Health officials said they are making sweeping changes in the way they handle sexual-misconduct complaints against health-care professionals. The department says it will:

Investigate each of the 100 or so sexual-misconduct complaints it receives each year. The department had dismissed a third of them without investigation.

Use emergency suspensions more often and more quickly to remove accused practitioners who may be dangerous to the public. Suspected offenders had remained in jobs during the course of investigations, sometimes victimizing again.

Stop improperly censoring public records that contain details about practitioners’ offenses, charges and disciplinary sanctions.

Open at least two dozen investigations into practitioners with hidden felony sex convictions, based on cases developed by The Times. The state so far has revoked the licenses of two registered nurses and a registered counselor convicted of sex crimes against children.