“There’s no dry day in the forecast after Friday,” warns a meteorologist. Seattle has had 140 rainy days since Oct. 1 — blowing past the previous record with more rain to come before the month is over.

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Friday is on track to be one of the warmest days of the year so far — but the sunshine will offer only a brief reprieve from a record-breaking stretch of wet weather. The National Weather Service predicts that clouds will start gathering again overnight, with a high chance of rain by late Saturday morning.

If the clouds hold off Friday night, it might be possible to get a glimpse of the Lyrid meteor shower. The shower is expected to be most intense Friday and Saturday, with the best viewing between 2 a.m. and dawn.

Wednesday marked the 140th day of measurable precipitation in Seattle since Oct. 1, says National Weather Service meteorologist Chris Burke. That easily blew past the previous record of 137 wet days between Oct. 1 and April 30, with several rainy days yet to come before month’s end.

The record for total precipitation in that period could also be topped before April comes to a close. Seattle has received 44.05 inches of rain since Oct. 1 — just a half-inch shy of the October-April record set last season.

Beginning Saturday, the forecast shows a 90 percent or greater chance of rain daily, at least through Thursday. “There’s no dry day in the forecast after Friday,” Burke said.

Friday’s predicted high at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport of 65 will likely be the second-warmest day of the year and only the sixth day in the 60s. Friday’s high in Seattle could reach 66 — on a par with the warmest temperature of the year so far, recorded on Sunday, April 16, at Sea-Tac.

But the long-term outlook is warmer. National climate models say it’s likely that the entire U.S. will be warmer than normal from June on, Burke said.

“That’s not a guarantee that it’s going to happen,” he added. “It’s just saying that there’s a greater chance.”

The previous record of 137 rainy days in Seattle between October and April was set in 1998-99 and 2010-11.

Conditions for meteor-watching are favorable — if the weather cooperates — because the moon is a waning sliver that won’t light up the night sky.