Temperatures on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday are expected to be about 10 to 15 degrees above normal with highs in the upper 80s to lower 90s, according to Logan Johnson, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Seattle.

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If it’s starting to feel you’re trapped in the movie “Groundhog Day” every time you read about the weather  — hot, dry and hazy —  well, you’re not alone. It really is pretty much a repeat of what we’ve been experiencing a lot this summer.

Temperatures on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday are expected to be about 10 to 15 degrees above normal with highs in the upper 80s to lower 90s, according to Logan Johnson, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Seattle.

Overnight lows for all three days are forecast to be in the upper 50s to low 60s, Johnson said.

“It will be some warm nights around here, especially for September,” he said.

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The only big difference it seems will be where the smoky haze is coming from, how close to the ground it will be and which group of wildfires is to blame.

In early August, when the Seattle region experienced heavy smoke and haze right in the middle of a record-setting heat wave that saw temperatures soar into the triple digits, the wind was blowing from the Northern interior, bringing us smoke from British Columbia.

Last week, the smoke was coming from raging wildfires in Eastern Washington near Cle Elum, which are threatening more than 3,800 homes and causing Level 3 evacuations in some areas. The fires prompted Gov. Jay Inslee to declare a statewide emergency.

On Sunday, the smoke — which Johnson said is up above 7,000 feet range and “almost looks like clouds” — is coming from wildfires in Southern Oregon and Northern California.

Johnson said the wind’s direction is expected to shift sometime in the next couple of days and start blowing out of the east again. That means we’ll start getting the smoke from the Cle Elum area fires again, which he said will be significantly closer to the ground and have an increased effect on air quality.

“When it’s at a lower elevation, visibility and air quality get worse,” Johnson said.  The only slight silver lining is that the low haze could keep temperatures slightly lower than they would be otherwise.