The 58-year-old worker was taken to Harborview Medical Center by paramedics in serious but stable condition, according to the Seattle Fire Department.

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A worker inside the Highway 99 tunnel was injured Saturday morning when he fell 15 feet from a tipping scaffold.

Investigations have been launched by contractor Seattle Tunnel Partners (STP) and by the state Department of Labor & Industries.

The 58-year-old worker was taken to Harborview Medical Center by paramedics in serious but stable condition, according to the Seattle Fire Department.

The mishap was reported at 6:57 a.m., from the south portal of the tunnel, where people and supplies enter to build the double-deck highway.

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Though tunnel-boring machine Bertha finished digging in April, there remain 1½ years of work until traffic enters in early 2019. The injured man apparently was installing a roadside wall, Chris Dixon, STP project manager, said Monday.

Lee Newgent, executive director of the Washington State Building and Construction Trades Council, says he’s gotten a half-dozen calls from union representatives since Saturday, saying they lack confidence in STP’s safety program.

“I think at this point, they should take a safety stand-down, a reset, and an evaluation,” Newgent said Monday. STP did interrupt construction last September to send workers to an extra hour of safety briefings after a wave of incidents.

Dixon said work continues normally, except at the site of the accident, until more facts are determined. One angle being considered is the influx of new workers this summer, and whether they’ve absorbed safety practices and culture, he said.

“The safety record for the work in the tunnel has been very good,” Dixon said.

The project began with fewer injury claims than average in 2012 and 2013. But in February 2015 four workers were hurt, one seriously, when a cage of steel reinforcing bar gave way.

Currently, injury claims with L&I are close to average for heavy construction. There have been no fatalities.

“We want everybody to get home at the end of the day, in at least as good a condition as when they started,” Dixon said.