The measure, also known as Proposition 1, was logging 58 percent approval in King County on Wednesday, and 52 percent in Snohomish County. In Pierce County, 56 percent of voters were rejecting the tax proposal.

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Sound Transit 3, the $54 billion plan to finance light-rail, commuter-train and bus-line extensions over a quarter-century has passed, despite Pierce County voters’ rejection of the measure.

The measure also known as Proposition 1, was logging 58 percent approval in King County on Wednesday and 51 percent in Snohomish County. In Pierce County, 56 percent of voters were rejecting the tax proposal. Overall, in the three-county Sound Transit district, 54 percent were voting to approve.

For the measure to fail, there would have to be a major turnaround with 56 percent of the remaining votes rejecting it.

The situation mirrors the Sound Transit 2008 vote, when Pierce County voters were alone in the three-county district in saying no.

This plan promises 62 more miles of light rail, Sounder trains as far south as DuPont, more park-and-ride spaces, and bus rapid transit for Highway 522 and Interstate 405.

These ST3 tax increases will take effect Jan. 1: property tax: $25 a year per $100,000 of assessed value; sales tax: 50 cents per $100 purchase; car-tab tax: $80 yearly per $10,000 of vehicle value.

In all, a median household would pay $326 next year in new taxes (or $169 per adult), plus $303 in existing Sound Transit taxes from voter-approved measures in 1996 and 2008.

ST3 opponents spoke often during the campaign about the cost to taxpayers over decades.

But on Wednesday, morning transit commuters talked of being happy that the plan was getting voter support.

Stephanie Zero, a Redmond librarian who doesn’t own a car, takes the bus to work — typically a 45-minute ride each way.

Even if her job is no longer in Redmond by the time light rail makes its way there by 2024, she said she’s looking forward to improved mobility around the region.

“For me, it’s totally worth the cost,” Zero said. “It doesn’t even matter where I’m working. It will help me.”