Remember 1998? Televangelist Pat Robertson upset Vice President George H.W. Bush in Washington's GOP caucus. Here's a look back at highlights from state caucuses over the past 40 years.

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About 200,000 voters are expected to participate in Washington’s Democratic precinct caucuses Saturday, with 101 delegates up for grabs for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Past caucuses have produced some remarkable moments for Republicans and Democrats over the past 40 years. A walk back through some of the highlights:

2012: Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney easily wins the state GOP caucuses, fending off Texas Rep. Ron Paul. President Obama is unopposed on the Democratic side.

2008: Barack Obama sweeps Seattle off its feet, drawing huge crowds to KeyArena on his way to a runaway caucus win over former front-runner Hillary Clinton. Arizona Sen. John McCain is a narrow choice for Washington Republicans, edging out former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.

Barack Obama speaks at KeyArena during a campaign rally in 2008. (Ellen Banner / The Seattle Times)
Barack Obama speaks at KeyArena during a campaign rally in 2008. (Ellen Banner / The Seattle Times)

2004: Sen. John Kerry wins the Democratic caucuses, beating former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. Running for a second term, President George W. Bush is the GOP pick.

2000: Texas Gov. George W. Bush dominates his rival, Arizona Sen. John McCain, in the GOP caucuses. Vice President Al Gore is the Democrats’ choice.

Republican presidential candidate Texas Gov. George W. Bush greets supporters during a campaign event at Bellevue Community College in February 2000. (Eric Draper / The Associated Press)
Republican presidential candidate Texas Gov. George W. Bush greets supporters during a campaign event at Bellevue Community College in February 2000. (Eric Draper / The Associated Press)

1996: Bob Dole wins the state GOP caucuses on his way to a thrashing defeat by President Clinton in the general election.

1992: Bill Clinton may have been known as the “comeback kid” in the 1992 Democratic race, but Washington caucus-goers were cool to him. Clinton placed fourth in the caucuses, behind ex-Massachusetts Sen. Paul Tsongas, former (and present) California Gov. Jerry Brown, and “uncommitted.” The state GOP sticks by President George H.W. Bush, who goes on to lose to Clinton in November.

1988: Televangelist Pat Robertson shocks the Republican establishment by winning the state GOP caucuses over the eventual nominee, Vice President George H.W. Bush. The stunning result helps lead to creation of a presidential primary in the state the next year. Democrats support Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis, with civil-rights activist Jesse Jackson a close second.

Marguerite Stangel and Dorothy Pettit sing with a choir at the Tacoma Dome’s convention center at a political rally for Pat Robertson. (Benjamin Benschneider / The Seattle Times, 1988)
Marguerite Stangel and Dorothy Pettit sing with a choir at the Tacoma Dome’s convention center at a political rally for Pat Robertson. (Benjamin Benschneider / The Seattle Times, 1988)

1984: Colorado Sen. Gary Hart wins the state’s Democratic caucuses over the party’s eventual nominee, former Vice President Walter Mondale. Mondale would go on to win only one state in the general-election landslide giving a second term to President Reagan.

Presidential candidate Sen. Gary Hart draws little attention on the ferry from Bremerton to Seattle. (Richard S. Heyza, The Seattle Times, 1984)
Presidential candidate Sen. Gary Hart draws little attention on the ferry from Bremerton to Seattle. (Richard S. Heyza, The Seattle Times, 1984)

1980: Ronald Reagan winds up with the support of most of Washington’s delegates, but not before a hard-fought battle with local supporters of Illinois Rep. John B. Anderson, who would later run as an independent. State Democrats back President Carter in their caucuses.

1976: The last presidential contender from Washington, Sen. Henry M. “Scoop” Jackson, wins his home-state caucuses, but his campaign for the Democratic nomination falters in part over his support of the Vietnam War. Meanwhile, state Republicans narrowly back Vice President Gerald Ford in precinct caucuses, but later rounds of caucuses and conventions turn the state delegates for Ronald Reagan.

Sen. Henry M. (Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times, 1980)
Sen. Henry M. Jackson (Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times, 1980)