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Sketched April 28, 2016

In 2011, painter Jane Richlovsky and some hundred other artists were evicted from the building that sits directly above Bertha’s path.

The historic property at 619 Western Ave. was falling apart, but it escaped demolition when the state gave it an extensive upgrade to bring it up to code. Once restored, the building’s six floors became prime office space and new tenants started moving in.

Richlovsky said the artists knew the old warehouse would become fancy, and they didn’t expect to come back. Most moved to Georgetown or farther away. She was able to establish a smaller colony of 13 artists’ lofts at 110 Cherry St., right in the heart of Pioneer Square. It’s called ’57Biscayne.

Tech employees now roam 619 Western, where Richlovsky spent 10 years launching her career. But she doesn’t hold grudges. She only hopes no more artists are driven out of Seattle as the city grows.

Painter Jane Richlovsky, left, and tintype photographer Libby Bulloff are two of the few artists from the Western Building who managed to stay in the neighborhood after the eviction. Their studios are on the second floor of the storied Scheuerman Building at the intersection of Cherry Street and First Avenue.
Painter Jane Richlovsky, left, and tintype photographer Libby Bulloff are two of the few artists from the Western Building who managed to stay in the neighborhood after the eviction. Their studios are on the second floor of the storied Scheuerman Building at the intersection of Cherry Street and First Avenue.