Mount Rainier National Park rangers will begin leading park visitors on seasonal snowshoe walks tomorrow. But the winter snow-play area at Paradise will not open...

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Mount Rainier National Park rangers will begin leading park visitors on seasonal snowshoe walks tomorrow. But the winter snow-play area at Paradise will not open to the public until there’s at least 5 feet of snow.

Ranger-guided walks will be offered twice daily through Jan. 2, then on weekends only through April 3. Walks are scheduled at 12:30 and 2:30 p.m. from the Henry M. Jackson Visitor Center at Paradise. Visitors can sign up one hour before the walk at the visitor-center desk.

Youngsters must be at least 8 to join the walks. Participants must bring their own warm clothing and waterproof boots, and the park will provide snowshoes. A $1 donation is encouraged.

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Signs of the season


The Tim Allen movie “The Santa Clause” will be shown free as a Washington Mutual Winterfest holiday event at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in Seattle Center’s Center House.


Holiday helpers


For the second consecutive year, Tacoma artist Bonnie Burns, who operates a glass-blowing studio and gallery, has been creating miniature glass hearts and sending them to Fort Lewis soldiers stationed in the Middle East. She calls her project Hearts of Hope.

She’s also helping a Fort Lewis group collect new, unwrapped toys for youngsters of military families, and nonperishable food items for St. Leo’s Church in Tacoma and Northwest Harvest. Donors qualify for discounts at her Tacoma art-glass gallery at 1334 S. Fawcett St.

Individuals and companies are invited to sponsor a soldier by purchasing a heart. Burns’ next shipment of miniature hearts will be sent on Monday. Contributions to help cover production and shipment costs are being accepted. Information is online at www.bonnieburnsglass.com, or call 253-627-6556.


The zoo’s two


Woodland Park Zoo’s pair of Sumatran tiger cubs, both males, now have names: Langka (pronounced LONG-ka), which is Indonesian for “rare,” and Manis (Maw-NEES), Indonesian for “sweet.”

The 3-month-old cubs go on public display for the first time tomorrow in the zoo’s feline house, now called the Adaptations Building. Viewing hours are 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily.

Here & Now is compiled by Seattle Times staff reporter Charles E. Brown and news assistant Suesan Whitney Henderson. To submit an item, e-mail herenow@seattletimes.com
or call 206-464-2226.