The three-week kidnapping trial of Richard Dunn often became a forum for him to complain loudly about jail conditions, evidence, witnesses and his own health. Yesterday, when a King...

Share story

The three-week kidnapping trial of Richard Dunn often became a forum for him to complain loudly about jail conditions, evidence, witnesses and his own health.

Yesterday, when a King County Superior Court judge sentenced Dunn to 30 years in prison for kidnapping and molesting a boy in Kingsgate in 2001, Dunn used the opportunity again to proclaim his innocence and to criticize everything down to his drab jail clothes and the judge’s new beard.

“It’s easy to get angry. It’s easy to hate,” Dunn said. “I see myself through the eyes of an innocent man. … There’s not a night that goes by when I don’t pray for [the victim’s family].”

But after weeks of Dunn’s speeches, Judge Michael Hayden appeared to have little sympathy. The sentence he gave Dunn, 42, was five years longer than even prosecutors had requested. Hayden said he agreed with a mental-health evaluator who had called Dunn condescending, paranoid and extremely dangerous to society.

Most Read Stories

Unlimited Digital Access. $1 for 4 weeks.

“There is very little about that evaluation with which I would quarrel,” Hayden said.

The exceptionally long sentence came because a jury last month decided that when Dunn snatched a 6-year-old boy from an apartment complex and kept him tied up in a bedroom, he had acted with sexual motivation and deliberate cruelty toward a particularly vulnerable victim.

The jury decided on those aggravating factors a day after convicting Dunn of first-degree kidnapping, first-degree child molestation and six counts of possessing child pornography. He faced a standard sentence of 12 to 16 years in prison, but prosecutors asked for a 25-year term. Dunn abducted the boy in June 2001. During the trial, the boy testified that Dunn told him to shut up, then drove him to Dunn’s apartment two blocks away in his neighborhood northeast of Kirkland.

The boy testified that Dunn beat him with a belt and pushed him against a bathroom wall. Police found the boy the next day, tied up on Dunn’s bed. Dunn was arrested a few hours later.

The boy’s mother told Dunn yesterday that her son has had emotional problems since the kidnapping, including depression and confusion. “I want you to know the pain you have caused my family, especially my son,” she said. “You should think about it in your jail cell.”

Dunn’s prosecution was delayed several times. In one instance, one of his attorneys left the case after Dunn refused to undergo a psychiatric examination.

During yesterday’s sentencing, Dunn remained uncooperative throughout. At one point he refused to ink his fingerprints onto court papers. Hayden summoned five extra King County Jail guards to force him. After Dunn saw the guards and talked to his attorney, he complied. Dunn’s attorney, Nicholas Marchi of Seattle, said he plans to appeal the conviction.

Ashley Bach: 206-464-2567 or abach@seattletimes.com