The high-class cars, their drivers and passengers kicked off a 700-mile tour of the Pacific Northwest — and sparked a little envy along the way. “We love it,” said one owner, a divorce attorney.

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What do you get when you have two dozen Lamborghinis lined up in the ferry lot waiting to start a 700-mile luxury driving tour? A little bit of envy, perhaps, and a ton of awe.

“What an amazing day,” said Randy Hart, who was working construction at Washington State Ferries’ Colman Dock when the cars rolled in around 8 a.m. “I didn’t expect to see a car show. They’re beautiful vehicles. I love looking at them. I only wish my son was here.”

The cars and their drivers are all taking part in the Giro 2017 — Pacific Northwest, which costs nearly $13,000 to even participate in, and is billed as the “most anticipated Lamborghini event of the year.”

This year the five-day journey starts in Seattle, winds over the Hood Canal Bridge and through Astoria, Oregon, before ending up in Portland.

Alessandro Farmeschi, the chief operating officer of Lamborghini America, was driving the company’s flagship super car, the Aventador with 740 horsepower and a top speed of 217 mph.

The vehicle sells for about $440,000 which Farmeschi says is “reasonable for a unique car in the market.”

Seattle seemed a particularly meaningful place for the Giro to start this year, he said, because the company’s newest carbon-fiber technology is being developed at the Seattle-based Lambo Lab, in cooperation with Boeing and the University of Washington.

As onlookers swarmed around the vehicles and took pictures, the owners were proud and happy to talk about their cars, luxury Italian vehicles that start at $200,000 and stretch well up into the $700,000-plus range.

Roger Townsend, left, and Geoff Entress watch as the Lamborghinis board a ferry to Bainbridge Island on Friday. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Roger Townsend, left, and Geoff Entress watch as the Lamborghinis board a ferry to Bainbridge Island on Friday. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

Bill Tinker, of Texas, was driving the Limited 2014 Anniversary Edition in yellow.

Tinker said he is probably among the top 1 percent of wage earners, and he doesn’t feel guilty about it. He started his career as a restaurant and food-service worker. He later started his own restaurant and now owns a chain called Redneck Heaven and is about to open his fourth location.

He deserves the fruits of his labor and the fulfillment of his childhood dream, when he promised himself he’d have a Lamborghini one day.

Matt Hill, of Michigan, San Diego and Italy, was bored in high school when he started his own tech company at age 16 called Liquid Web, which he has since sold.

He drives a 2015 Aventador Roadster that costs about $550,000.

He said he’s been the target of some envy, but finds there’s less spite on the West Coast.

“Life is ridiculous,” said the 36-year-old. “What is there but to work hard, show some humility and enjoy whatever you can.”

Bryan Salamone, a divorce lawyer from Long Island, New York, and his wife, Divina — who grew up dirt poor, and jokingly but accurately said she made her money “by marrying a rich man” — were in their fourth Lamborghini.

It’s a flashy, tricked-out, chrome version of a “very limited” edition of the Super Veloce model. It has a license plate that says “WINNING” and it’s been used in music videos and charity events and borrowed by celebrities such as 50 Cent, JLo and French Montana.

Divina Salamone takes a photo from the top of her and her husband Bryan’s Lamborghini while driving through downtown Seattle Friday morning.  (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Divina Salamone takes a photo from the top of her and her husband Bryan’s Lamborghini while driving through downtown Seattle Friday morning. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

The Salamones love the attention they get in the car and have been swarmed, including once in Times Square when the crowd thought Divina — who typically rides perched atop the car in a cropped halter top, waving and letting her long, platinum hair fly — was Lady Gaga or Nicki Minaj.

“We love it,” said Bryan.

He claims that he and his wife have certainly been the targets of “jealousy, envy and spite,” but they don’t let it bother them. He also said he is aware of life’s fragility and how quickly circumstances can change.

“I’m scared sometimes of reversals of fortune,” he said. “People can get divorced, suffer strokes, lose their health … so we just live for today, and if our fortunes are reversed, at least we had these experiences.”

David Hill, of Boston, who started a consulting firm, said he considers his Gallardo Spyder “a smile machine.”

It certainly makes his girlfriend, Marion Jones, happy.

“It’s awesome,” she said. “I love speed!”