Honesto Silva Ibarra, 28, went to a Bellingham clinic complaining of headaches after picking berries at Sarbanand Farms, according to several news reports. He collapsed and was later transported to Harborview Medical Center, where he died.

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Washington Labor and Industries (L&I) launched an investigation into a Sumas blueberry farm Wednesday to determine if any workplace conditions caused the death of a temporary worker who died Sunday.

Honesto Silva Ibarra, 28, went to a Bellingham clinic complaining of headaches after picking berries at Sarbanand Farms, according to several news reports. He collapsed and was later transported to Harborview Medical Center, where he died.

Labor and Industries Public Affairs Manager Tim Church said the agency opened two separate investigations: workplace safety with health inspection and employment standards.

The first investigation and inspection Church said will determine if “this was a workplace-related death and, if so, how.”

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Four L&I employees were at the farm Wednesday talking with managers, notifying them of the investigations. The investigation into Ibarra’s death and possible safety and health violations could take up to six months.

L&I officials will want to hear firsthand accounts of the working conditions, he said. Workers told KING 5 TV they’ve faced an abusive and unfair working environment, as well as poor sanitary conditions.

Church said if they discover health and safety dangers while on the property, they will expect Sarbanand managers to correct them immediately. Last week, people working outside were challenged by the high temperatures and poor air quality due to the British Columbia forest fires.

Ibarra, a father of three, was on a temporary, agricultural-worker visa, H-2A, from Mexico.

In response to his death and other workplace-safety conditions, some workers refused to return to the work. Sarbanand then fired 70 of them and on Tuesday many protested near the farm, according to KING 5.

The second investigation will determine if workers were getting paid on time, and if they had appropriate rest and meals. If in violation, the farm could face a $250 fine per civil infraction for each worker involved. L&I will also investigate if workers were provided with an agreement that explains working conditions, hours and expected pay, Church said. Each violation of this type can cost up to $1,000 per employee.

“It was clear there was a variety of issues coming out of this situation,” he said. “If we found multiple violations, the fines can be quite large.”