In only his second month co-hosting a show on NPR, Luke Burbank is returning home to Seattle. The reason: to spend more time with 13-year-old...

In only his second month co-hosting a show on NPR, Luke Burbank is returning home to Seattle. The reason: to spend more time with 13-year-old daughter Addie Sandstrom.

On his “Bryant Park Project” program Tuesday morning, Burbank, 31, said he’s quitting his job and leaving New York City.

Burbank, who’s anything but stuffy, announced his news in poignant but irreverent fashion. (See the video link at www.npr.org/blogs/bryantpark)

“So here’s the thing about living 3,000 miles away from your kid. It really sucks. You miss her all the time. You wonder if you’ve got your priorities straight. All of this makes getting up at 3 a.m. particularly unpleasant.”

Burbank, who graduated from Nathan Hale and the University of Washington, first worked at Seattle’s KUOW-FM after answering an ad in his college newspaper, according to his NPR online bio.

He then reported stories for “This American Life,” “All Things Considered,” and “Morning Edition” and also served as temporary host for the popular quiz show “Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me!”

“The Bryant Park Project,” NPR’s younger-skewing morning show, debuted Oct. 1 and marked Burbank’s second high-profile radio gig. He co-hosts the show with Alison Stewart. The show, which airs from 5-7 a.m. on KXOT 91.7 FM in Tacoma, is carried in 16 markets.

He’ll co-host “The Bryant Park Project” through Dec. 14. After that he’s not sure what he’ll do, although he’s been talking to some people about some radio jobs, Burbank said in an interview Tuesday from his Brooklyn, N.Y., residence.

But it’s been more than three years since he lived here full time.

“I’m so excited to be near a Taco Time again,” he quipped about his pending homecoming. “And as a former employee of Dick’s I’ll be spending more time there, too.”

Florangela Davila: 206-464-2916 or fdavila@seattletimes.com