Odd moments in Eastside history Bellevue's first newspaper, The Lake Washington Reflector, was published from 1918-34 by W. Eugene LeHuquet. Five of the nine LeHuquet children...

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Odd moments in Eastside history


Bellevue’s first newspaper, The Lake Washington Reflector, was published from 1918-34 by W. Eugene LeHuquet. Five of the nine LeHuquet children helped sell subscriptions and advertising, run the press and even scoured the small town for news. A youthful LeHuquet daughter was teased for years after she printed a story about a man arrested for “a salted battery.” The young journalist was clearly not familiar with assault and battery.


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If you’re recycling and need a quick way to tell whether a paper food container is plastic or wax coated, try the scratch-and-tear test: if you scratch it and thin bits of wax scrape off, then it’s wax coated and recyclable only in certain Eastside communities. However, if you tear it and see paper sandwiched between thin layers of plastic, go ahead and rinse it, flatten it and recycle it anywhere on the Eastside.

Communities served by Waste Management should put plastic and wax-coated food containers in with their regular curbside recycling, while Rabanco requests that waxed items be placed in the garbage container. To determine whether your neighborhood is served by Rabanco or Waste Management, you can go to www.metrokc.gov/dnrp/swd and select your community from the “Garbage & Recycling” pull-down menu.


Fast fact


The Salvation Army food bank in Renton served 920 families per month in 2004 — more than 3,200 people.

Compiled by Nyssa Rogers: 206-515-5625 or east@seattletimes.com.

Eastside Almanac appears on Wednesdays in the Eastside edition of The Seattle Times. This week’s sources include: www.historylink.org, “Bellevue: Its First 100 Years” by Lucile McDonald, “Bellevue Recycling: It’s in your future” by Rabanco-Eastside Disposal and 2005 Renton Community Calendar.