Spotlight: River flow With the flooding in the Snoqualmie Valley, terms like flood stage, stream flow and discharge keep floating by, but just how much water are we really talking...

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Spotlight: River flow



With the flooding in the Snoqualmie Valley, terms like flood stage, stream flow and discharge keep floating by, but just how much water are we really talking about?



At the U.S. Geological Service station about a quarter-mile below Snoqualmie Falls, the average daily stream flow for Jan. 18 is 4,544 cubic feet per second. In other words, enough water passes through that section of the Snoqualmie on an average Jan. 18 to more than fill a typical 20-foot-by-40-foot swimming pool every second.





Flooding can start in that area when stream flow exceeds 20,000 cubic feet per second. Yesterday, as the river was rising, water flowed at 36,100 cubic feet per second. That’s enough to potentially put 20 acres of land under a foot of water in just under one minute.







Odd moments in Eastside history



In 1986, Lake Washington School District began teaching an italic-style handwriting method called Getty/Dubay, named for its developers, a Portland elementary-school teacher, Barbara Getty, and a university calligraphy instructor, Inga Dubay. It’s a more streamlined writing system, with few differences in letter shapes between printing and cursive writing. Getty/Dubay has none of the loops commonly associated with cursive. Lake Washington chose the method so as to modernize its curriculum for an increasingly “please print” society.





But after four years of complaints from parents, and laments from children unable to read letters from grandparents, the district reconsidered. In 1990, it returned to the more familiar loop-cursive style, called D’Nealian.



We mention this because Sunday is National Handwriting Day.



For a look at the five most common handwriting methods, visit www.cep.pdx.edu/samples/compare.pdf.





Compiled by Nyssa Rogers: 206-515-5625 or east@seattletimes.com.





Eastside Almanac appears on Wednesdays in the Eastside edition of The Seattle Times. This week’s sources include: waterdata.usgs.gov/wa/nwis,www.poolinfo.com/Pool-Volume.htm and www.onlineconversion.com