On one of the youngest city councils in King County, Jack Crawford and Steven Colwell are veterans. The two have served since the city of...

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On one of the youngest city councils in King County, Jack Crawford and Steven Colwell are veterans.

The two have served since the city of Kenmore incorporated in 1998, rotating in and out of some of the city’s key positions — mayor, deputy mayor, council member. Nearly all plans for change in the city have crossed their hands.

“Their fingerprints are on everything,” said City Manager Stephen Anderson.

Crawford and Colwell are stepping down from the council after their terms end this year, ending what some call the city’s period of planning.

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Incorporation helped give residents the opportunity to directly control the fate of their city, and the council has been developing plans to renovate, remodel and reshape the community.

“The evolution that I’ve seen [of the council] is one of planning and putting in the comprehensive plan, the downtown plan, the park plan, the vision of the future. Now it’s the implementation phase, and that brings a different dynamic to it,” Anderson said.

In their nearly eight years on the council, Crawford and Colwell have overseen the development of several of the city’s major plans for growth, especially for downtown. Today Crawford will see a development he spearheaded — a new skate park for the city’s youth — open on the former Northshore Park & Ride lot.

Crawford has “always been very concerned about the youth of our city, and he’s the one who spearheaded the skate park,” Colwell said.

Colwell said he and Crawford are leaving the city in good shape after helping build its foundation, which includes a $35 million surplus.

“We’ve made the city a safer place, we’ve added sidewalks, we’ve added children-friendly watch-protection programs, I feel real good about that,” Colwell said.

Sitting in his pickup outside City Hall, Crawford looked out over the nearly 10 acres of downtown scheduled for developments and said when he is replaced next year, new council members will pick up where he, Colwell and others who were around at the beginning left off.

Crawford said it will be difficult to detach himself from the council’s actions.

“You make decisions that affect the lives of people, particularly for the next generation,” Crawford said.

Ari Bloomekatz: 206-464-2540 or abloomekatz@seattletimes.com