Land-use applications in Woodinville are on track to hit a five-year high by the end of 2005, and officials say the data help show how the...

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Land-use applications in Woodinville are on track to hit a five-year high by the end of 2005, and officials say the data help show how the young city is maturing.

Woodinville received 107 land-use applications in 2004, up from 69 in 2003 and 73 in 2002. The city had received 71 applications by Aug. 1 this year.

Submitting a land-use application is the first step for those who want to use their property for business, commercial or other projects. The number of applications submitted is one of several indicators of city growth, said Ray Sturtz, community-development director.

Sturtz said that in 2000, just seven years after Woodinville incorporated, land-use applications were at 112 but dropped because of the economic downturn. He said the numbers now indicate things are improving.

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“It’s fluctuated somewhat, but it’s definitely picked up the pace here for a few years in a row,” Sturtz said.

Permits-center director Dean McKee said a commercial, residential and industrial foundation was laid after Woodinville was incorporated, and the new projects and applications will bolster the city.

“The infrastructure, the properties, are beginning to fill up with use,” McKee said. “It’s a city that’s maturing, from what it was to what it wanted to be.”

McKee is at the tail end of the land-use application process and issues the permits that let construction begin.

Instead of just large developers and business owners filing applications, McKee said, families and potential small-business owners are proposing smaller projects.

Officials say more thoughtful and innovative construction projects are being proposed and that the landscape of Woodinville is changing.

McKee said in addition to just buildings and housing developments, Woodinville is getting more parks and trails.

There are other developments in Woodinville, too, and the city recently held a meeting about $40 million in proposed capital improvements.

Sturtz said the growth is helping change the perception of Woodinville.

“People think of Woodinville as just another suburban city,” Sturtz said. “It has the schools, it has the parks, it has a real downtown. … It is a real city, not just a bedroom community.”

Ari Bloomekatz: 206-464-2540 or abloomekatz@seattletimes.com