Redmond firefighters battled a house blaze Thursday in a rural area where fire hydrants are scarce. They were able to contain the fire and...

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Redmond firefighters battled a house blaze Thursday in a rural area where fire hydrants are scarce.

They were able to contain the fire and no one was hurt. But firefighters said it was one of the many occasions when they had to compensate for a lack of close and accessible hydrants in rural areas.

“We have to choose our tactics wisely,” said Capt. Rob Torrey of the Redmond Fire Department. “Woodinville and Redmond definitely have to deal with this on a regular basis.”

Thursday’s single-alarm fire broke out in the 7500 block of 224th Avenue Northeast east of Redmond around 1:20 p.m. when an elderly woman noticed flames on her stove.

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Because the area has few hydrants, fire crews ordered a 500-gallon tanker truck to the scene so they could have a steady supply of water.

The owner of the home tried throwing baking soda on the fire but was unable to extinguish the flames and grabbed her dog and left the house. By the time authorities arrived, the one-story home was about 40 percent engulfed in flames.

Torrey said the blaze was under control within an hour, but that a hose had to be attached to the nearest hydrant about 500 feet away so firefighters could continue attacking the flames after they had used the water in the tanker truck.

At least 27 firefighters were at the scene with four engines and two ladder trucks. Torrey said there was no monetary estimate yet for the damage but that smoke and flames likely had destroyed the house.

A similar fire broke out in June in the 25600 block of Northeast 100th Street, and firefighters had to cart water to the scene with fire engines from a hydrant a couple of miles away.

A lack of hydrants is a common problem in less densely developed areas, Torrey said. Firefighters are trained for such situations and have procedures in place for when hydrants aren’t easily available.

Torrey said the normal procedure is to order a tanker truck until a constant water supply can be established through the closest hydrant.

Ari Bloomekatz: 206-464-2540 or abloomekatz@seattletimes.com