Three days after the Nov. 8 general election, several Eastside city council races still were undecided. One was separated by barely more...

Share story

Three days after the Nov. 8 general election, several Eastside city council races still were undecided.

One was separated by barely more than a dozen votes after more ballots were counted Friday. In Woodinville, Randy Ransom led Hank Stecker by just 15 votes.

The makeup of the council could change depending on the outcome, with Stecker being part of a slate of candidates rallying to bring new blood to what was termed “old school” council politics. Ransom, a former council member, was a target of that campaign.

In Kenmore, Laurie Sperry was 38 votes ahead of Patrick O’Brien, with the fate of city cardrooms possibly depending on the outcome. Sperry has sworn to close cardrooms, while O’Brien has sought a way to keep the city’s one cardroom open.

Most Read Stories

Unlimited Digital Access. $1 for 4 weeks.

One of two contested seats for the City Council in Snoqualmie remains tight, with Bryan Holloway leading Gil Tumey by 42 votes.

State law provides that if the difference in vote totals is less than 2,000 votes and within one-half of 1 percent, the county canvassing board shall conduct a recount of all votes cast for a position. The election is to be certified the last week of the month.

In Bothell, Del Spivey was leading Ernie Bellecy by 164 votes. Spivey was leading in the King County section of Bothell, while Bellecy was leading in the Snohomish County section.

Issaquah had two close races. Councilman Bill Conley led former Councilwoman Maureen McCarry by 25 votes. In the other race, citizen activist Connie Marsh was trailing retired local businesswoman Eileen Barber by 95 votes.

Marsh, who has been attending city-government meetings for six years and has become an outspoken advocate on various issues, said she was satisfied.

The number of votes “legitimatizes my position [as an activist] and all the work that I’ve done,” she said. “People didn’t expect that I would have as strong a backing, and here I am.”

She said that win or lose she would continue being a watchdog of city government.

Sonia Krishnan: 206-515-5546 or skrishnan@seattletimes.com