A bass player who has hit a perfect chord, his head turned into the instrument as he goes inside the notes. A trumpeter blowing a riff...

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A bass player who has hit a perfect chord, his head turned into the instrument as he goes inside the notes.

A trumpeter blowing a riff, his fingers a pyramid on the brass valves.

A guy playing a tenor sax, the bell of the instrument nestled up to a microphone.

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Sinewy arms and fists of jazz musicians sliding out the metal sleeves of their trombones.

The striking, moody images capture jazz musicians’ hands “at the moment of music,” said the photographer, Richard Duval.

Self-taught on the piano, self-taught in photography, Duval has found a way to fuse the two arts. The Mill Creek artist’s pictures have been seen in wine shops, galleries and elsewhere, and he plays music at his art openings.

Duval, 49, finds a home in both pursuits, especially in his “A Touch on Jazz” series, color-saturated portraits on display at the new Art & Soul Gallery in Bothell’s Country Village. Tomorrow, Duval will be on hand for a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. that will include a silent auction of a work to benefit Cascadia Community College in Bothell.



“A Touch on Jazz”



Jazz portraits by Richard Duval are on display through March 16 at the

Art & Soul Gallery, 23732 Bothell-Everett Highway,

in Bothell’s Country Village.

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Duval will perform music during a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. tomorrow. Information: 425-487-3777.


Whether his camera is focused on the Seattle skyline, the big island of Hawaii or Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, Duval calls himself an “organic” photographer, working with filters and film.

But for this project, he culled his files for photos, sent them to three digital artists and told them the color palette he wanted.

With his digital colleagues — Carmen Fuchs, Donna Weber and Joan Bertucci — “I basically acted as the art director,” Duval said. “I wanted the color theme to be blues and reds, and I wanted it to look like the last set of the night. It’s got to have that end-of-the-day, world-weary feel to it.”

The artists spent about three months sending images back and forth, narrowing the work to eight of the best. There’s an intimacy and an anonymity to the portraits.

“It wasn’t about the performer — it was about the performance,” Duval said.

Because Duval is also a musician, he said believes he has an instinct for when to click the shutter in performance photos.

RICHARD DUVAL/CARMEN FUCHS

Duval’s “A Touch on Jazz” series of color-saturated portraits is on display at the new Art & Soul Gallery in Bothell’s Country Village.

Susan Yaranon, the owner and curator of Art & Soul, said Duval’s work “really captures the moment.”

“His work is new and interesting; it’s a different take on photography,” she said.

Duval earned an undergraduate degree in journalism from Washington State University and a master’s in communications from the University of Washington. He’s a consultant in marketing and communications for technology companies and education organizations, and is a former board member of the Cascadia Community College Foundation.

For Duval, playing music is “like painting”:

“I never got into piano to be a performer … I wasn’t interested in learning songs. … I was interested in all this music I had running through my head that I wanted to get out.”

Diane Wright: 425-745-7815