Ballard businesses have appealed a King County Superior Court ruling on the "missing link" of the Burke-Gilman Trail through Ballard. The appeal was filed with the state Court of Appeals by a group of marine and industry businesses, who argue it's unsafe for the trail to pass through the heavy industrial area of Ballard.

A group of Ballard business owners have filed an appeal of a King County Superior Court ruling on the “missing link” of the Burke-Gilman Trail through Ballard.

The appeal was filed with the state Court of Appeals by the marine and industry businesses, who argue that it’s unsafe for the trail to pass through the heavy industrial area of Ballard.

When Judge Jim Rogers ruled in April on a lawsuit by the businesses along the proposed Ballard route, he upheld most of the route but said one five-block section, from 17th Avenue Northwest to Northwest Vernon Place, must undergo an environmental review. The city decided not to appeal that ruling and is doing the review.

But the businesses, which lost most of their court case, said they would appeal Rogers’ ruling.

    Most Read Stories

“My clients want a trail that is safe and which does not undermine the viability of the maritime and industrial businesses and provides benefits for the entire community,” said Josh Brower, an attorney representing the Ballard businesses.

He said the businesses support Rogers’ ruling on one part of the trail, where he ordered the new environmental review, but said the entire trail should be studied.

Rogers’ ruling delayed the completion of the $14 million project, which would complete the trail through Seattle.

Businesses along the proposed trail long have protested the routing, arguing it would destroy maritime businesses in Ballard.

This “missing link” of the trail stretches along Shilshole Avenue Northwest from 11th Avenue Northwest by the Ballard Fred Meyer store to the Ballard Locks.

The Ballard businesses are pushing for a “Copenhagen-style” track through Ballard, with protected bike lanes between the street and the sidewalk.

Susan Gilmore: 206-464-2054 or sgilmore@seattletimes.com