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ELLEN BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Angelina Zhu, 4, right, and Jia Hao Ho, 4, both of Seattle, play on “Sand Dragon Play Structure” by Gerard Tsutakawa at the International Children’s Park in Seattle’s International District. In the background is Liu Ho, Jia’s mother. The family was enjoying Seattle’s recent sunny weather.

Bold. Strong. Beautiful. Whimsical. Engaging. Art all around the city of Seattle — in its parks, streets, community centers, libraries, utilities facilities and municipal offices — can be described in many ways. In 1973, Seattle was one of the first cities in the United States to adopt a percent-for-art ordinance. One percent of Seattle’s eligible city capital-improvement-project funds go to the commission, purchase and installation of artworks in a variety of settings. Permanently placed artwork, both indoors and out, can be found all around the city. There are more than 380 permanent and integrated works and 2,800 portable works in Seattle.

ELLEN BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

“Urban Peace Circle, Gerard Tsutakawa, Sam Smith Park. This large-scale bronze sculpture with a black patina finish is the culmination of a gun buy-back program instituted by Stop the Violence, an organization founded in 1992 in response to the tragic deaths of six youths from the Puget Sound area. Its composition is meant to contrast the chaos and violence of the present with hope for a peaceful future. Several of the reclaimed guns are entombed in the concrete base of the sculpture according to Seattle Parks and Recreation Department’s Communications Manager Dewey Potter.