The Seattle-based Chaotic Noise Marching Corps plays hard rock and Latin, classical, Brazilian, all-instrumental foot-stomping, move your feet to the beat music in the street.

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Chaotic Noise Marching Corps is a street punk band. While its decibel-level is high, its “chaotic noise” level is low.

The band plays hard rock and Latin, classical, Brazilian, all-instrumental foot-stomping, move your feet to the beat music in the street.

While improvisation is encouraged, the degree of musicality and discipline required is significant.

A view from the trombone of musician Tracy Rage of Chaotic Noise Marching Corps, a Seattle street punk band. (Alan Berner / The Seattle Times)

It’s a tight family. You have to be voted in.

Trumpet player Luis Benito says, “you have to be musically proficient, performance proficient and (we ask) do they fit?

“Would you mind sitting on the bus with this person for five hours?”

The 25 to 30 members play for no pay. It’s all volunteer.

There are two, two-hour evening rehearsals every week plus the gigs.

A different band member leads each rehearsal.

Trombonist Tracy Rage circles up two dozen at a dead-end street next to Jack Perry Memorial Park in Sodo.

She polls the group on their favorite song to play, keeps things on time for a self-described “renegade band,” a regular at Honk! Fest, West and Georgetown events.

Members have to make a living when not playing. Some make jewelry, are software designers, bakers, grant writers, nannies, aerospace workers or do odd jobs.

Benito says, “maybe they were nerds, played in high school or college, are comfortable with being weird.” They find a family in Chaotic Noise and take pride in their musicality.

The sun has set, they finish their rehearsal under streetlights with “Cemetery Girls.” It’s a band favorite and often the last song in the set. Then all fall down.

While they’re a punk marching band with a wide range of songs, there’s no John Philip Sousa in the repertoire.

But, Benito says, “we could probably trick it out.”