Catching up: Two Seattle entrepreneurs — including one who relocated to London — have found different results.

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Original magazine story: May 15, 2016

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President Obama shakes hands with a small child after arriving at SeaTac on Friday afternoon on Air Force One. June 24th, 2016. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)
President Obama shakes hands with a small child after arriving at SeaTac on Friday afternoon on Air Force One. June 24th, 2016. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

Brexit cast a bit of a damper on one Seattle entrepreneur’s move to London. Since Marcelo Calbucci spoke in May about the adrenaline rush that comes with starting young companies, he has moved to a city where even more fast-growing businesses are popping up.

Calbucci, a serial entrepreneur who founded and worked at many startups in Seattle, decided to move with his family to London over the summer to tap into the city’s startup scene.

There are probably 10 times as many startups in London than he saw in Seattle, he says.

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“Because of government incentives here, investors get a huge tax break if they invest in early-stage startups,” he says.

The Brexit decision came right after Calbucci decided to move, and has caused quite a bit of concern and uncertainty in London. No one knows what’s going to happen, so businesses are postponing major decisions. Still, Calbucci says he wouldn’t think of leaving the startup world.

“This is where most of the innovation is happening,” he says.

Back at home, Karissa Bodnar has not made a fool of herself, one of her chief concerns when she started a cosmetics company that benefits women undergoing cancer treatment.

Thrive Causemetics has moved into a bigger space and is making a profit — a big accomplishment for the 2½-year-old business.

Bodnar is in good company. A recent estimate from the Washington Technology Industry Association says there are more than 260,000 tech workers in the state. Startup leaders are hoping more of them will make the move to smaller companies as the job “entrepreneur” becomes widely accepted on resumes.