Once a colony of Britain and now a self-governing territory, Bermuda retains some British traditions, although most tourists now come from the U.S. and its currency is pegged to the U.S. dollar.

AT A BERMUDA golf course, some of the world’s top golfers gaze out at what could be an immense water hazard. Instead it’s just the azure-hued Atlantic that surrounds the 21-square-mile island nation and edges the world-class golf course.

Although tiny in size, Bermuda is a major golf destination and a mighty tax haven, a headquarters for international businesses, thanks to its lack of income tax. Celebrities and well-heeled tourists flock to the island, lured by balmy white-sand beaches and peaceful, luxurious resorts.

Once a colony of Britain and now a self-governing territory, Bermuda retains some British traditions, although most tourists now come from the U.S. and its currency is pegged to the U.S. dollar. Thanks to its near-perfect weather (apart from the occasional hurricane), every day is a great day for golfing, and the Port Royal Golf Course is the current home of the PGA Grand Slam of Golf, an annual season-ending tournament that brings together the world’s top golfers each fall.

Last October, golfers Bubba Watson, Keegan Bradley and Webb Simpson were among a group gazing out to sea from Port Royal during the PGA Grand Slam. It’s a place every golfer, and golf fan, would like to be.

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Kristin R. Jackson is The Seattle Times’ NWTraveler editor. Contact her at kjackson@seattletimes.com.