Rodger Azadganian sits outside his upscale hair salon, Seven, at Bellevue Square, and waxes on about the difference between a haircut and a hairstyle.



Rodger Azadganian sits outside his upscale hair salon, Seven, at Bellevue Square, and waxes on about the difference between a haircut and a hairstyle. A haircut at the salon, or the one in Seattle, will cost you $50 or more, but a personal cut from Azadganian himself costs $200. Here are seven hair questions for the man from Seven, aka 7:

Q: How much does a hairstyle reflect personality?

A: A lot. Just like you choose the colors you wear for a reason. People often want something new but don’t go for it. The key is finding someone who can help bring it out in you.

Q: Why do you wear your hair long?

A: It’s my personal style. I think of myself as an artist. It makes me feel creative, out of the mold. Maybe because I’m older (42), I feel a little better in this short hair than I would have before. I haven’t had hair this short in eight or 10 years.

Q: Why’s it short now?

A: I lost a bet on the World Cup. I took France and bet my hair. I had to pay whatever haircut the guy wanted. It’ll grow.

Q: Why hair?

A: I got into it because of the movie “Shampoo.” After that I got my hair cut at a salon, not a barber. My dream was to get into the film industry.

Q: Could you critique some looks of the people walking by?

A: That woman (middle-aged, dressed down) with the black hair, shoulder length. Her hair is too long and her bangs take away from her eyes and make her look older. I’d make it less weighty at the bottom — most women carry too much there — to make her look more youthful.

This woman (mousy straight hair) is all one length. No style. No effort. Long hair isn’t more feminine; that misconception is instilled by men who seem to find short hair on women threatens their masculinity. Short hair can be sexy, sensuous and beautiful, but a lot of women are afraid to cut their hair because their husbands might say something.

Q: Can you show me someone who’s doing it right?

A: This woman (young and attractive) with the curly hair is doing it right. She has strong features but it’s a yin-and-yang thing. You need to have contrast to have balance. She took the time styling her hair instead of just getting up and going. Her curls soften her features.

Q: How’d you pick the name “Seven”?

A: It was between Seven and Rive Gauche, the Left Bank in Paris. My son was born on the 7th of October, and as I looked into the number I developed a fascination with it, especially as I learned more about its place in world history.