More than 17 years ago, state Fish and Wildlife signed a landmark deal by purchasing the Point No Point Boathouse on the Kitsap Peninsula’s northeastern corner with the purpose of preserving this popular wildlife access site.

While the actual boathouse built in the 1920s is just a faded memory, state fisheries has finally completed some of the long-awaited restoration work.

“This is a very beautiful area, and we’re excited as work on finishing the project continues,” said Kristen Kuykendall, a state Fish and Wildlife engineer. “We’ve completed the upland portion of the project, which includes a new parking lot with around 60 spaces (36 are suited for boat trailers) plus overflow parking, landscaping, lighting and a toilet system.”

State fisheries bought the 3.7 acres of land — situated on one of the most pristine Puget Sound beaches with views of Mount Baker to the northeast and Mount Rainier to the south — in 1996 for $860,000 from Vic Nelson, the former boathouse owner who closed it in 2002 for safety reasons.

“We’re still working on the mitigation permit for the boat launch, and are hopeful to start the in-water project by next summer,” Kuykendall said. “We had the opening day of salmon fishing (July 16) in the area, and there was a great turnout at the new site.”

Once approved, the concrete single-lane boat ramp will be approximately 20 feet wide and 100 feet long, extending down during a low tide to the zero-foot tide line.

In the meantime, Kuykendall said anglers and boaters may launch small car-topper style boats and other watercraft themselves by carrying their craft to the beach.

“We’ve had quite a few people with car-toppers use the shoreline launch, and it is a great place since the fishing happens right out in front of the lighthouse,” Kuykendall said. “One thing I’d like to remind people who use the facility is to respect the neighbors and the private lands on both sides of the access site.”

The grounds around the lighthouse are also a good place for nature viewers on the shore, and in small boats, kayaks and canoes.

Since this is a state Fish and Wildlife parking and access site, people will need to have a Discover Pass (http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/discoverpass/) to use the facility. Anglers are given a Discover Pass when a fishing license is purchased or they can be bought separately.

State Fish and Wildlife estimates the cost of renovating the boat launch and site will cost about $2 million. They along with other sport-fishing groups worked with the state legislature to secure capital-budget funding to reestablish the Point No Point access site.

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