In one of today's editorials, the Seattle Times supports the Reproductive Parity Act, a legislative measure that would guarantee insurance plans continue to cover abortions if they cover maternal care in Washington.

In one of today’s editorials, the Seattle Times supports the Reproductive Parity Act, a legislative measure that would guarantee insurance plans continue to cover abortions if they cover maternal care in Washington.

Forty years after the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade decision legalizing the procedure, polls indicate a majority of Americans support a woman’s right to choose.

The Guttmacher Institute has produced five infographics to commemorate this milestone.
Also check out the video below for a visual look at abortion trends in the United States. I hope the facts will open your eyes.

A Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll finds that seven in ten Americans believe the ruling should stand.


That is the highest level of support for the decision, which established a woman’s right to an abortion, since polls began tracking it in 1989. The shift is mostly the result of more Democrats backing the decision—particularly Hispanics and African-Americans—and a slight uptick in support from Republicans.

This separate Gallup poll concludes “significantly more Americans want the landmark abortion decision kept in place rather than overturned, 53% to 29%. Another 18% have no opinion, the highest level of uncertainty Gallup has recorded on this question in trends dating to 1989.”

Gallup also reports that support drops off significantly when respondents are asked about abortions in the second and third trimester. What about the group that has no opinion on the matter?


This suggests that the generation born entirely after Roe became law has had less exposure to information about the decision than those who lived through the original decision, or were at least old enough to witness some of the major abortion debates during the 1980s and ’90s.

That lack of context is exactly what concerns the generation of women who remember life before Jan. 22, 1973.

On Tuesday evening, Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest commemorated the 40th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade by hosting a discussion with Sarah Weddington, the attorney who successfully argued the case at the age of 26.