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Hail to columnist Brier Dudley for telling it like it is regarding the failure of Pronto [“Bike-sharing is a neat amenity, but it’s not working in Seattle,” Opinion, Feb. 9].

In a city where unsolved life-or-death human needs have been bottlenecked waiting for funds and solid strategies for years, the mayor’s bike advocates are opening (our) wallets for Pronto’s bailout.

The critics have long lobbied unsuccessfully to license and register bikes to have them participate in the high costs of the transportation budget. Only then, perhaps a bailout for bike-share programs could be justified. The commuter bike riders can help in the bailout of the increased recreational bike-share riders.

The irony is that such registrations are now seriously considered for drones for the very same rationale why bikes should be.

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While Pronto bike-share facilitates tourists and pleasure bike riders graciously, we are turning a blind eye to the homeless who occupy the very streets and parks that they ride on.

Though this may not be the true thoughts in mayor’s mind, it sure sounds dangerously close to, “Let them eat cake. Let the hungry and homeless wait.”

Dee Tezelli, Seattle