Reggae fans, film buffs or those simply happy the election season is over should reward themselves with the story of the tenacity of spirit that was Jamaican superstar Bob Marley.

Reggae fans, film buffs or those simply happy the election season is over should reward themselves with the story of the tenacity of spirit that was Jamaican superstar Bob Marley.

The documentary by Kevin Macdonald, “Marley,” debuted in early 2012 and has been dazzling film festivals around the world. Marley’s all too short life was a triumph of ambition and talent over the circumstances he was born into. He grew up dirt poor in remote Nine Mile village, and suffered as an outcast because of his biracial parentage.

Marley’s story is the roots of reggae, and the evolution of Bob Marley & The Wailers from 1963 to 1981. The music and sound of reggae most listeners world would recognize emerged late in his career. The producer credited with discovering Marley and giving him to the world, Danny Sims, died last month at age 75.

Marley was a devout follower of Rasta, a faith that blends belief in the divinity of Haile Selassie, ganja and a revolutionary spirit. Marley was a gifted writer and performer, whose popularity was exploited by the politics of the time. He literally carried the scars of the passions of his time.

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