Teens have adopted some of the hot hair trends, while adults have picked up on nail art and those cozy swim parkas.

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Maddy Wiederkehr, 11, who lives in Westchester County, N.Y., has been putting her hair up in a tidy Aly Raisman-style topknot since watching the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Her first stop after returning from summer camp last week was the Cozy Cuts for Kids salon in Manhattan. She got a professional’s take on her new favorite style. “I like that it’s smooth,” she says. “There’s no bumps. It’s perfect.”

Gymnastics dictates that hair be neat and pulled back from the face. In Rio, the go-to looks have been the French-braid-into-a-ponytail worn by Simone Biles and Madison Kocian; the Aly-knot; and the traditional scrunchied ponytail. (The Scunci company reports a boost in sales of its snap clips, hair shimmer and scrunchies because of the Olympics.)

“Hair is how you stand out, because in competition we all have to wear the same leotard,” says Ella Wilson, a 12-year-old gymnast from Brooklyn who has taken to wearing the braid-into-ponytail of late.

Her soccer-player brother, Liam, 14, is a fan of the man bun seen widely at the Olympics on soccer and basketball players, and most notably on British gymnast Louis Smith. Fans cheekily blamed his knot for a pommel horse fall. But Liam sees the hairstyle’s inherent value.

British gymnast Louis Smith’s infamous man bun.  (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
British gymnast Louis Smith’s infamous man bun. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

“It’s cool-looking, but it’s also good for sports because I have a long top,” he says. “It keeps my hair up.”

Teenagers are most likely to embrace an athlete’s style, but adults are caught up in the Olympic moment, too. They show their fandom primarily through nail art. Nadine Abramcyk, a founder of the Tenoverten nail salons in New York City, saw an uptick in patriotic manicures the day after a big win by the U.S. team.

“We’re known for subtle nail art, and one of our lead manicurists, Frances Liang, created an abstract-looking star design,” she said. “People have been getting that in gold, red, white and blue.”

And a lot of viewers have been asking if they can get the cool, knee-length parka worn by the U.S. swim team. The parka, made by Arena, will be available at arenawaterinstinct.com soon, the company says.