Forget the white satin pumps. More brides are opting for color and sparkle on their wedding shoes.

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Forget the staid satin pump or ballet flat on your wedding day — especially if your soul yearns for sparkle.

Shoes in bold hues or with whimsical accents or metallic shine are bringing modern-day style to even the most classic wedding looks.

Shoes have always played a role in wedding traditions. During medieval times, brides wore shoes their fathers gave them to the wedding and changed into shoes provided by their husbands for the service.

Tradition has also called for fathers of brides to tuck a silver sixpence into their daughters’ shoes to usher in prosperity: “Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue, and a sixpence in her shoe.”

For her 16th century wedding, 14-year-old Catherine de’ Medici of Italy chose metallic high-heeled pumps to wed the future King Henry II of France. From that moment on, heels would be the shoe de rigueur of wedding days for centuries.

It wasn’t until 1840, when England’s Queen Victoria wed Prince Albert, that all-white everything would become the official bridal hue of the West. Matching shoes would be key to the matrimonial uniform through the late 1990s.

These feather-accented black shoes drew attention at the 2018 Marchesa bridal collection show in April. (Richard Drew / The Associated Press)
These feather-accented black shoes drew attention at the 2018 Marchesa bridal collection show in April. (Richard Drew / The Associated Press)

Now, as more brides desire individuality over tradition, unique shoes are wedding-day cool.

Crowds gathered at the feet of one model at a recent Marchesa bridal presentation. She was wearing a pair of black shoes with feathers.

“That trend really jumped out at us because black isn’t usually a color you associate with bridal, but done the way it was done this season, it felt very romantic and elegant,” says Shelley Brown, fashion director for the wedding site TheKnot.com. “I think black accents are a classic way to make a statement.”

Georgina Chapman, half the Marchesa design team, says shoes can be a personal affair for brides.

“They want to know they have them underneath there,” Chapman says. “It’s like wearing great lingerie, you know, not many people may see it, but you know you have it on.”

Other trends Brown has seen: embellished wedding sneakers, feather accents and shoes with laser-cut leather that would be perfect for the right bride.

And it’s not just about black and white, she says. Pastels, iridescents and metallics have been on recent runways, too, in both dresses and shoes.