There are no two ways about it; a personalized thank-you letter is your last chance to impress an employer. So make it count.

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You would think that, short of misspelling the recipient’s name, there would be very few ways to screw up a one-page thank-you letter.

But any number of minor slip-ups can cost you a potential job opportunity. One that hiring managers have been seeing more and more often is the use of the form thank-you letter.

Yes, you read that right. One-size-fits-all thank-you letters is a trend that probably got started with the availability of so many templates on the Internet. Templates can get you started, but it is never a good idea to just copy them word for word. It makes you look lazy, and it’s sort of rude.

But most of all, the form thank-you letter is bad because it represents a lost opportunity. It robs you of the chance to remind your potential employer one more time why you are such a great candidate for the job. A thank-you letter is first and foremost a sincere thank-you, of course, but it is also a venue to repeat the highlights of your interview and demonstrate your interest in the job.

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So once you have thanked your interviewers for their time and consideration, find a way to pleasantly and succinctly restate your qualifications. Mention again what you have to offer this employer. Describe, briefly yet specifically, why and how you are the answer to filling this employer’s needs.

You must do all of this, of course, in one page. It’s not easy, but it’s worth it, because the thank-you letter is your chance to sell yourself and your skills all over again. You can even use it to correct any mistakes you made during the interview. Form thank-you letters can’t do any of that. In fact, they are almost worse than no letter at all.

Other common bloopers include misspelling the recipient’s name (or, worse, using the wrong name); mixing up the name of the company; making spelling or grammar mistakes; choosing unprofessional-looking stationery; including a gift; sending the letter so late that the interviewer has forgotten who you are; and using an automatic card-sending service.

There are no two ways about it; a personalized thank-you letter is your last chance to impress an employer. So make it count.

Karen Burns is the author of The Amazing Adventures of Working Girl: Real-Life Career Advice You Can Actually Use. Email her at wg@karenburnsworkinggirl.com.