Before becoming a bailiff, I was a private investigator and spent many hours at the Clerk’s Office.

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What do you do? I am bailiff to Chief MRJC Judge Mary E. Roberts, currently assigned to the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent. I coordinate the criminal motions, arraignment and bond calendars. My duties also include managing the court’s calendar, acting as a liaison to the media, scheduling and tracking motions, processing orders, responding to inmate correspondence and monitoring case readiness for more than 100 civil trials.

How does someone else get a job like yours? Experience in the legal field is a must. Before becoming a bailiff, I was a private investigator and spent many hours at the Clerk’s Office reviewing legal documents and searching court records. In order to excel at this job, you must be committed to the public, focused, trustworthy, perceptive, detail-oriented, outgoing, and above all, have a great sense of humor.

Best part of the job? The best part of my job has to be the people I work with every day. In order to run an efficient courtroom and one that is welcoming to the public, it takes the joint efforts of a number of people from our clerk to the many prosecutors, defense attorneys, court staff, detectives and correctional officers who appear before Judge Roberts.

What surprises people about your job? That it even exists! Most people are surprised that I don’t wear a uniform or carry a gun like Bull on “Night Court “or Byrd on “Judge Judy.”