One in three overseas Filipinos lives in the United States and the U.S. government is leading the international relief effort after Typhoon , but most Americans areHaiyan tuned out of the disaster’s aftermath, the Pew Research Center reported Tuesday.

A Nov. 14-17 survey of 1,013 U.S. adults found less than a third of them were following the tragic consequences of the monster storm, the Pew pollsters found.

Even fewer, 14 percent, said they had contributed to disaster relief, although donations typically tend to be slow in the early days after a devastating storm or earthquake, the researchers noted. An additional 17 percent of those polled said they planned to send money to help the victims of Haiyan.

General interest in the Philippines tragedy and limited humanitarian response were low compared with Americans’ reactions to other recent disasters, the Pew report said.

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After the earthquake-triggered tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan in March 2011, 55 percent of Americans surveyed by Pew said they were closely following the plight of the Japanese. In 2004, 58 percent of those polled said they were watching coverage of developments after the Indian Ocean tsunami, and 60 percent of Americans asked about the 2010 earthquake in Haiti said they were tuned in to the tragedy.

The researchers drew no conclusions as to why the Philippines’ disaster has failed to galvanize as much empathy or charitable response as other recent disasters, especially given the close political ties between the two countries and the presence of 3.4 million Filipinos in the United States.

Since the typhoon hit central Philippines islands on Nov. 8 with record wind force, nearly 4,000 people have been confirmed dead and the toll is expected to rise as debris is cleared and searches for the missing are exhausted.