In other items: Connecticut Gov. M. Jodi Rell underwent breast-cancer surgery yesterday; and Cincinnati police are not fully cooperating with a federal monitor appointed in the wake of riots in 2001 triggered by an officer's fatal shooting of an unarmed black man, the monitor said in a report released yesterday.

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Boston

A storm that dumped freezing rain and as much as 18 inches of snow on the East Coast snarled post-holiday travel yesterday, stranding hundreds of drivers on slick roads and reducing Boston’s Logan Airport to a single runway.

More than 20,000 customers were left without power in Massachusetts, prompting several Cape Cod towns to open temporary shelters. Service was restored to most of them by midmorning.

At least three traffic deaths were blamed on the weather, one in Massachusetts and two in North Carolina.

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Dozens of flights in Boston were delayed or canceled, but the runways were back in full operation by midmorning.


Hartford, Conn.


Governor undergoes surgery for cancer

M. Jodi Rell, 58, is governor of Connecticut.


Gov. M. Jodi Rell underwent breast-cancer surgery yesterday after doctors discovered the disease in its very early stages, the governor’s office said.

Rell, 58, was expected to remain at Danbury Hospital until tomorrow, officials said. Doctors told her staff that the mastectomy and reconstructive surgery were performed without any problems.

The governor’s office said the cancer was discovered after a routine mammogram and that tests showed the disease had not spread to her lymph nodes.

Rell, the former lieutenant governor, became governor in July after John Rowland resigned.


Cincinnati


Police cooperation spotty, monitor says

Police are not fully cooperating with a federal monitor appointed in the wake of riots in 2001 triggered by an officer’s fatal shooting of an unarmed black man, the monitor said in a report released yesterday.

Police officials refused access to documents requested by a member of the monitor’s staff and refused to let the staff member ride along with police on an inspection of known drug locations, the report said.

Saul Green, a former federal prosecutor, heads the team overseeing implementation of a 2002 agreement to change police policies and a related settlement of a racial-profiling lawsuit.

In the 2002 agreement, police agreed to improve training, reform use-of-force policies and change the way supervisors track performance. The city also pledged to improve relations between police and blacks.

A police spokesman did not immediately return a call seeking comment.