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FLINT, Mich. (AP) — The latest on the drinking water crisis in Flint, Michigan (all times local):

11:45 p.m.

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is asking President Barack Obama to issue an emergency and major disaster declaration amid the Flint water crisis.

Snyder’s office said in a statement late Thursday night that it had asked for the declarations and is seeking additional federal aid for both individuals and public agencies involved in the effort to provide Flint residents with clean drinking water.

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Flint’s tap water became contaminated with too much lead after the city switched its water supply in 2014 to save money while under state financial management. Local officials declared a public health emergency in October.

The statement says Snyder’s request will be reviewed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which will advise the president on whether the declarations should be granted.

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5 p.m.

Dozens of people — some lugging jugs of dirty water in protest of the water crisis in Flint — have criticized Republican Gov. Rick Snyder during a demonstration Thursday inside the Michigan state Capitol.

MLive.com and WDIV-TV report that the protesters arrived in Lansing via buses from Flint and Detroit.

Flint’s tap water became contaminated with too much lead after the city switched its water supply in 2014 to save money while under state financial management. Local officials first declared a public health emergency in October in response to tests that showed children with elevated levels of lead.

Snyder spokesman Dave Murray tells MLive.com that the governor “acted aggressively” and announced an action plan after becoming aware of the lead levels. Snyder declared an emergency in Flint earlier this month.

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3:30 p.m.

An official at the Genesee County health department says the agency has been “bombarded” with phone calls from anxious residents, a day after state officials said the number of Legionnaires’ disease cases had increased.

Chief health officer Mark Valacak tells The Associated Press he “had no idea” that Gov. Rick Snyder was holding a news conference Wednesday to disclose the findings.

Valacak says his department hasn’t made a direct link between Flint water and bacteria that causes Legionnaires’ disease. State officials haven’t made one either.

Valacak says Legionnaires’ disease isn’t associated with drinking tainted water. People can get sick if they inhale mist or vapor from contaminated water systems.

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3 p.m.

Members of the United Auto Workers Region 1-D say they will supply bottled water to three community centers in Flint.

The union has secured 18 pallets of one-gallon water jugs and 20 pallets of bottled water. The water is intended to supplement resources being provided by an emergency operations center. Details are expected to be announced Friday.

Flint’s tap water became contaminated with too much lead after the city switched its water supply in 2014 to save money while under state financial management. Local officials first declared a public health emergency in October in response to tests that showed children with elevated levels of lead.

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10:40 a.m.

Michigan State University and a Flint hospital are putting a team together to keep a long-term eye on Flint’s lead problem, from offering nutrition tips to residents to health monitoring.

The effort will be led by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, who is credited with sounding the alarm last year about high levels of lead in children.

Drinking water that lacked treatment for corrosion caused lead to leach from old plumbing in Flint for about 18 months.

Hanna-Attisha, a doctor at Hurley Medical Center, says she wants to bring “hope” to a community that’s “traumatized.”

The Genesee County health department and the Michigan health department will also have roles.

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7 a.m.

Donations of bottled water are coming in from around Michigan to help Flint residents amid the city’s drinking water crisis.

The Flint Journal reports that Kroger Co. of Michigan and UA Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 370 of Flint worked together to donate 16 truckloads of bottled water to the city. The first four truckloads of bottled water were scheduled to be delivered Thursday.

In northern Michigan, the Traverse City Record-Eagle reports that Suttons Bay Congregational Church is collecting bottles and jugs of water for a homeless shelter and soup kitchen in Flint.

WHMI-FM reports Pinckney’s school district in southeastern Michigan also is collecting water.

Flint’s tap water became contaminated with too much lead after the city switched its water supply in 2014 to save money while under state financial management.