Prosecutors said late Wednesday they were holding off on a decision to try the driver of a sightseeing bus that plowed into a crowded Times Square plaza until they receive a full toxicology report.

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Prosecutors said late Wednesday they were holding off on a decision to try the driver of a sightseeing bus that plowed into a crowded Times Square plaza until they receive a full toxicology report.

Preliminary drug and alcohol tests for William Dalambert came back negative, a spokeswoman for the Manhattan District Attorney’s office said.

“We are taking this matter seriously,” the spokeswoman, Joan Vollero, said in a statement. “(Prosecutors) are conducting a thorough investigation.”

Police said there was no evidence Dalambert had been drinking, but he failed a field sobriety test after Tuesday’s crash, leading the department to float the theory that he may have been high on drugs.

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The New Jersey man was to be arraigned on Wednesday on charges of driving while impaired, but the decision of the district attorney’s office appeared to short-circuit that development.

The name of his lawyer wasn’t immediately available.

Dalambert was at the wheel of a Gray Line bus that crashed into another double-decker tourist bus on Tuesday before traveling onto a sidewalk at Duffy Square, the location for the TKTS discount Broadway ticket booth.

The accident sent 14 people to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Dalambert’s driving record includes 20 suspensions, though motor vehicle records show all of his privileges had been restored and he has a valid New Jersey license, according to state motor vehicle spokeswoman Sandy Grossman. His record includes license suspensions for non-payment of child support, uncompleted paperwork and fines on top of previous violations for not paying insurance, Grossman said.

He has a commercial license to carry passengers and endorsements to drive a number of other vehicles, including a motorcycle, a tanker, double and triple trailers and school buses, Grossman said.

There was no immediate response to a phone message left on Wednesday with Gray Line. On Tuesday, a spokesman for Gray Line’s parent company said, “Our hopes and prayers are with the injured, and we are cooperating with the authorities.”

Manhattan has seen a proliferation of the double-decker buses since 2005, when there were eight bus companies. Now there are 14 bus companies, operating more than 260 buses, but accidents are rare.

On June 18, a woman was struck by a City Sights double-decker tourist bus in Greenwich Village and was seriously injured.

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Associated Press writers Michael R. Sisak and Jake Pearson contributed to this report.

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