Most dogs exposed to Lyme disease show no signs of infection and recover on their own, according to a story in The Washington Post. But a small percentage run fevers, become lame, lose their appetite or, in rare instances, die. And some of America's favorite breeds -- golden retrievers and Labrador retrievers -- seem to...

Most dogs exposed to Lyme disease show no signs of infection and recover on their own, according to a story in The Washington Post. But a small percentage run fevers, become lame, lose their appetite or, in rare instances, die. And some of America’s favorite breeds — golden retrievers and Labrador retrievers — seem to be particularly at risk to the tick-borne disease.

Two species of ticks transmit Lyme: the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) on the East Coast and the Western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) on the West Coast.

According to Public Health — Seattle & King County, Lyme disease is uncommon in the Pacific Northwest. In Washington state it occurs primarily in the western half of the state.

Read the full story here.