Last fall, officials predicted more than 500,000 coho would return to the Columbia River, but the number turned out to be only about 100,000.

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Washington and Oregon adopted the spring chinook seasons for the Columbia River this week, leaving anglers little left to do now except impatiently wait for six weeks to see if the salmon actually arrive.

Last fall, officials predicted more than 500,000 coho would return to the Columbia River, but the number turned out to be only about 100,000.

It is assumed deteriorating ocean conditions in the north Pacific, including a patch of warm water referred as “the blob,’’ took a huge toll on those coho.

Will spring chinook suffer the same fate?

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“There is reason to be cautious,’’ said Pete Hessemer, anadromous fisheries manager for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Four of Idaho’s hatcheries provide 50 percent of the lower Columbia catch.

Chris Kern, an assistant administrator of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, also was concerned.

“I treat that (so few coho) as a warning,’’ he said. “We’ll keep an eye on the run size.’’

Fishing already is open downstream of Interstate 5.

On Wednesday, Washington and Oregon adopted a season of March 1 through April 9 from Buoy 10 to Beacon Rock for boaters and upstream to Bonneville Dam for bank anglers.

The daily limit is two hatchery steelhead or one hatchery spring chinook and one hatchery steelhead.

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