This is part of an occasional series profiling local family or kid products for the holiday season. Three local game makers want to keep...

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This is part of an occasional series profiling local family or kid products for the holiday season.

Three local game makers want to keep families entertained this season.

• Evolution, a board game invented by a Kirkland couple, follows in Cranium’s footsteps. Teams try to complete a series of tasks, ranging from figuring out puzzles to answering trivia questions to drawing or acting out words. Teams move around the board, “evolving” from primate to “super human,” each with its own challenges. Though targeted at ages 12 and up, it’s best played with multigenerational groups, since many teens won’t get older pop-culture references, such as naming the four members of U2. The $34.95 game is available at local stores, including Nordstrom, or www.platypusgames.com.

• Two Washington sisters created Funanigans to add a personal touch to family holiday gift exchanges. Each person answers set questions (example: What superpower would you bestow on that family member?) or creates a poem about another family member to share during the party. More question variety would be nice, especially for larger groups, but it’s a fun way to trade family stories. Kits start at $30 (for up to 8 people); www.funanigans.com.

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• For families with young children, WonderLetters is a simplified version of Scrabble that uses only three letters at a time. Letters are marked on top of cylinders that can be filled with stickers, small treats or notes; players collect removable bottom caps (and inside treats) depending on the number of letters in their created word. For parents who don’t believe kids should need an extra incentive to play a game, collecting caps with stickers is sufficient. The $24.99 game, from the Seattle company that designed WonderChess, is geared to young elementary-school-age kids; www.wonderchess.com.

Stephanie Dunnewind, Seattle Times staff reporter