Cut cores out of tomatoes and cut a shallow X in the opposite end. Bring water to a boil in a saucepan. Add tomatoes, remove from heat and time about 30 to 60 seconds, just until the skins...

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4 servings

– 2 medium tomatoes
– 6 cups water

– 1 fish bouillon cube

– ½ cup dry white wine

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– 1 bay leaf

– 1 medium clove garlic, peeled and minced

– 4 medium green onions, white part only, finely chopped

– 1 sprig fresh basil

– ¼ teaspoon saffron threads

– ½ teaspoon kosher salt

– ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

– 1 to 1 1/3 pounds halibut fillet or substitute another moderately firm fish

1. Cut cores out of tomatoes and cut a shallow X in the opposite end. Bring water to a boil in a saucepan. Add tomatoes, remove from heat and time about 30 to 60 seconds, just until the skins begin to loosen. Remove tomatoes with a slotted spoon (do not drain liquid) and rinse briefly with cold water. When cool enough to handle, remove peels and cut each tomato into quarters. Place in a large, 12-inch nonstick skillet, or use a Dutch oven.

2. Drop bouillon cube into tomato blanching liquid, stirring to dissolve. Pour into the pan with the tomatoes, adding wine, bay leaf, garlic, green onions, basil, saffron, salt and pepper. Bring just to a boil. Cut the halibut into 4 serving pieces. Place in the liquid, skin-side down. (The liquid should cover the fish.) Cover, turn heat to medium low, and simmer gently 10 minutes per inch of thickness, or until cooked through.

3. Remove bay leaf and basil from the pan. Remove skin from fish and spoon into shallow bowls. Ladle broth and tomatoes over fish and serve.

Note: The fish and broth can be served with rice, potatoes, couscous, or a good, crusty bread to soak up the liquid.


Data per serving


Calories 163

Protein 24.44g

Fat 2.87g

Carbohydrates 4.02g

Sodium 422mg

Saturated fat 0.40

Monounsaturated fat 0.88g

Polyunsaturated fat 0.91g

Cholesterol 36.46mg


Based on “The South Beach Diet Cookbook” by Arthur Agatston, M.D.