Put nuts in a skillet and set over medium heat. Toast until fragrant, about 5 minutes, stirring often. Transfer to a cutting surface. When cool enough to handle, chop nuts...

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Makes about 1 dozen

– 1 cup pecans or walnuts
– ¼ cup all-purpose flour

¼ teaspoon baking powder

– 1/8 teaspoon salt

– 1 pound semisweet chocolate, coarsely chopped (or use chocolate chips), divided

– 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

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– ½ cup granulated sugar

– 2 large eggs

– 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

– Parchment paper

1. Put nuts in a skillet and set over medium heat. Toast until fragrant, about 5 minutes, stirring often. Transfer to a cutting surface. When cool enough to handle, chop nuts coarsely and set aside.

2. Combine flour, baking powder and salt, whisking to blend. Set aside.

3. In the top of a double boiler set over simmering water, combine half of the chopped chocolate or chips with the butter. Stir gently until melted. Remove from heat and set aside to cool slightly.

4. In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine sugar and eggs; beat at high speed until thick and pale yellow, about 5 minutes. Lower speed to medium. Add chocolate mixture and vanilla, blending well. On low speed, add flour mixture and beat just until incorporated. Stir in nuts and remaining chopped chocolate. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate until firm enough to handle, about 60 minutes.

5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Using a ¼-cup ice cream scoop or a large tablespoon, drop portions of the dough about 3 inches apart on the sheets. Press down with your fingers to form rounds about ½-inch thick.

6. Transfer one baking sheet at a time to the center oven rack and bake 10 to 12 minutes, or until the cookies are set but still a little soft in the center. Cool on a wire rack 10 to 15 minutes. Using a wide spatula, transfer cookies to a wire rack and cool completely.

Note: The small amount of flour, ¼ cup, is correct.

From “Afternoon Delights: Coffeehouse Favorites” by James McNair and Andrew Moore