In a poll of 1,678 U.S. parents conducted by the University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, only four in 10 parents responding said they would get their children immunized against the H1N1 virus, even as 54 percent indicated they will get their kids vaccinated against regular seasonal flu.

Germ-spreading schoolchildren are expected to be the focus of a massive U.S. vaccination campaign against the H1N1 flu.

But if their parents are hearing the rallying cry to have their kids vaccinated, they’re not buying it, says a new national survey.

In a poll of 1,678 U.S. parents conducted by the University of Michigan’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, only four in 10 parents responding said they would get their children immunized against the H1N1 virus, even as 54 percent indicated they will get their kids vaccinated against regular seasonal flu.

Among those that said they do not intend to have their kids vaccinated against H1N1, almost half — 46 percent — indicated they’re not worried about their child becoming ill with the virus. One in five told surveyers they do not believe the H1N1 flu is serious.

About half of the parents who planned to take a pass on the H1N1 flu shot for their kids expressed concern about possible side effects of the vaccine.