This bar-restaurant serves the most blue collar of food: the Cornish pasty, lunch-pail fodder of British miners. Though here in Belltown, they are giving the traditional dish some updated culinary tweaks.

The menu: The premise focuses on baked crescent pasties that are traditionally stuffed with beef and potato, but here some riffs include Philly steak, curry chicken, beer aged corned beef and chicken cordon bleu. About a dozen pasty options from $11 to $14; each comes with a side of fries, salad or soup.

And because this is Belltown, there’s also bar food — wings, nachos, burgers and bacon mac and cheese, along with an excellent beer list and what is the most underrated cocktail menu in the area.

What to write home about: The salmon, in a buttery pastry shell, is stuffed with generous chunks of fish poached in white wine, asparagus and basmati rice. It comes with a side of lemon-dill hollandaise that you will want to dip and dip again. A bit random, but the chicken enchiladas ($11) were a surprise hit, layered with tortillas smothered with New Mexico Hatch green chili.

What to skip: The starchy Taos Chile Verde pasty ($9), with ground beef, potato and onion, is an inferior variation of an empanada.

The setting: Twisted Pasty is expanding to add a wine retail space. You can now also buy ready-made pasties to go. It seems to be a bit of everything. The bar takes up a huge chunk of the front room, and the back dining room looks like an entirely different restaurant. There’s also a modest sidewalk seating area.

Summing up: Three pasties served with a side of fries and the soup of the day (clam chowder) and a big bowl of kale salad ($9.50) totaled $48.18, enough for three. Come late (Monday-Thursday 9-10 p.m. and Friday and Saturday 9-11 p.m.) and those pasties are half-off with a drink purchase, a bargain late-night snack.

Tan Vinh: tvinh@seattletimes.com. On Twitter @tanvinhseattle