The Neighbor Lady is a local brothel-themed pub in the Central area with a menu that offers options for vegans, vegetarians, gluten-free devotees and meat lovers. Stephan Mollmann, owner of the nearby Twilight Exit bar, and Shira Bray, a Twilight bartender and manager, opened The Neighbor Lady last spring in the space where Thompson's Point...

For those on the hunt for a local brothel-themed bar, The Neighbor Lady has a booth for you. Tasseled lamps — including one shaped like a woman’s leg — illuminate the Central District pub’s dark interior and wraparound bar, while a collection of vintage arcade games gleams from its own enticing nook.

Stephan Mollmann, owner of the nearby Twilight Exit bar, and Shira Bray, a Twilight bartender and manager, opened The Neighbor Lady last spring in the space where Thompson’s Point of View used to be. The more health-centric of the two pubs, The Neighbor Lady offers plenty of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. Omnivores needn’t fear, however, that they’d be without meat for an evening. The menu has plenty of beefier items, including sliders, corned-beef sandwiches and meatballs.

A quick tip: You’ll have to order at the bar as there’s no table-waiting service.

The menu: Nearly every item has an asterisk (or rather, a high-heeled shoe icon) denoting vegetarian, vegan or gluten-free options. Shoestring fries or sweet-potato fries come alone ($5) or as a side to a Reuben ($10 with corned beef, $10.50 with Smoked Tomato Field Roast) or a BLT ($8.50 with bacon, $9 with tempeh bacon). Greener items on the menu include a spinach salad with a maple-cayenne mustard dressing ($8), a Caesar salad (small $5.25, large $8) and the rocket salad, made of spicy arugula, goat cheese and pine nuts in a roasted red pepper dressing ($8).

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What to write home about: The trio of house-ground beef sliders slathered with truffle aioli and served on petite potato rolls ($9) disappeared from the table in a hurry. For a vegetarian option, the Reuben with Smoked Tomato Field Roast, sauerkraut and rémoulade ($10.50) was delightfully flavorful.

What to skip: The house-made lentil walnut loaf ($11) was a bit flat in taste, but did a remarkable job replicating the texture of meatloaf for nostalgic vegetarians.

The setting: Mismatched lights, patterned wallpaper and the dim glow of the pinball corner.

Summing up: The rocket salad ($8), beef sliders with sweet-potato fries ($9), veggie meatloaf ($11) and the special of the day, a house-smoked pork sandwich called “The Havana” ($10), came to $38 before tax and tip, and were plenty for two with leftovers.