“Look out! Godzilla!” Before the tall, dark and scaly one returns to movie theaters in its latest incarnation on May 16, you can get your monster on with SIFF Cinemas’ “Giant Monsters All-Out Attack” series that includes a restored version of the 1954 Japanese original, 1961’s “Mothra,” 1962’s “King Kong vs. Godzilla” and 1955’s “It Came from Beneath the Sea.” Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., Seattle. Tickets are $6 for SIFF members, $11 general (206-324-9996 or www.siff.net).

The second annual Sci-Fi Film Festival continues for a second week with a galaxy full of films and special events including a Q&A with local actor Tom Skerritt and a screening of 1979’s “Alien” at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 3, and a Q&A with “Number One” Jonathan Frakes and a screening of “Star Trek: First Contact” at noon on Sunday, May 4. Tickets for these presentations are $25. The festival runs through May 14 at Cinerama, 2100 Fourth Ave., Seattle (206-448-6680 or www.cinerama.com).

The Seattle True Independent Film Festival (STIFF) opens at 7 p.m. Friday, May 2, with a screening of Mars Horodyski’s comedy/drama “Ben’s At Home” and a block party at Lucid, 5142 University Way N.E., Seattle. The festival runs through May 10 at several locations. For more information, go to trueindependent.org.

Over at Northwest Film Forum, Orson Welles’ 1952 adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Othello” plays Friday, May 2, through Thursday, May 8, and “Navajo Star Wars,” featuring 70 voice actors speaking five Navajo dialects, plays Friday and Saturday, May 2 and 3. 1515 12th Ave., Seattle. Tickets are $6 for NWFF members, $8-$12 general admission (800-838-3006 or ).

The 28th Amendment National Roadshow, featuring a screening of the documentary about campaign reform, “Pay to Play: Democracy’s High Stakes,” comes to Seattle from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, May 3, at the University Temple United Methodist Church, 1415 N.E. 43rd St., Seattle; $15-$25 (28amend-movi.nationbuilder.com/seattle).

“Four Sisters,” a documentary about surviving suicide, will screen at 6:30 p.m. Monday, May 5, at the UW Social Work Commons, Room 305, 4101 15th Ave. N.E., Seattle. Admission is free, but reservations are requested (206-543-1016 or foursistersdoc.com).

Takashi Murakami’s first live-action feature, “Jellyfish Eyes,” about a young boy who moves to the Japanese countryside with his mother, will have three showings at the Henry Art Gallery, Friday-Sunday, May 2-4. 4100 15th Ave. N.E., Seattle. Tickets are $5 for Henry members, $10 general (206-543-2280 or www.henryart.org).

The 11th annual Langston Hughes African American Film Festival continues through May 4 at 104 17th Ave. S., Seattle. Individual tickets are $5 for youth under 16/seniors ages 65 and older, $10 general admission. Festival passes are $50-$150 (206-684-4758 or langstoninstitute.org). For a preview of the fest, go to www.seattletimes.com and search for “NFFTY and Langston Hughes.”

The “Friday Night at the Meaningful Movies” series presents Jacob Kornbluth’s 2013 documentary “Inequality for All,” which takes a “greatest-hits” approach to Robert Reich’s theory that we’re headed for another financial debacle, at 7 p.m. Friday, May 2, at Keystone Congregational United Church of Christ, 5019 Keystone Place N., Seattle. The event is free, donations accepted (meaningfulmovies.org).

And finally, over at Central Cinema this week, you can watch the Muppets head to New York in 1984’s “The Muppets Take Manhattan” or the second half of Quentin Tarantino’s revenge drama
“Kill Bill: Vol. 2.”
Tickets are $7 per film. 1411 21st Ave., Seattle (
central-cinema.com
).

Doug Knoop: dknoop@seattletimes.com or on Twitter @dougknoop