Seattle-area writers dominate this year's picks by the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association for its 2005 Book Awards. The winners, tapped as the most exceptional books published...

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Seattle-area writers dominate this year’s picks by the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association for its 2005 Book Awards.

The winners, tapped as the most exceptional books published in 2004 by authors in Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho and Alaska, are:

“Honey, Baby, Sweetheart” by Deb Caletti (Simon & Schuster). This is a young-adult book by an Issaquah writer about a teen girl who falls for a rich, dangerous boy, but learns unexpected lessons about herself in the process. It was also a National Book Award finalist.

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Carmela D’Amico

“Ella the Elegant Elephant” by Carmela D’Amico and Steven D’Amico (Arthur A. Levine Books/Scholastic). A Seattle wife-and-husband writer-illustrator team produced this charming children’s book about an elephant who teaches her fellow elephants that it’s OK to be different.

“Broken for You” by Stephanie Kallos (Grove Press). A novel by a Seattle author about two eccentric women, 42 years apart in age. When the younger takes a room in the elder’s Capitol Hill mansion, they learn to find happiness in unexpected ways. “Broken For You” has also been tapped as a selection for the NBC “Today” show’s book club.

“Ordinary Wolves” by Seth Kantner (Milkweed). A novel by a resident of Kotzebue, Alaska, about a white boy who is raised in the tundra by Eskimos and must learn to reconcile his upbringing with the modern world.

“The Children’s Blizzard” by David Laskin (HarperCollins). Seattle author Laskin penned this nonfiction account of a monstrous 1888 Great Plains blizzard that took more than 500 lives, many of them children.

“Songs of the Gorilla Nation: My Journey Through Autism” by Dawn Prince-Hughes (Crown). A Bellingham resident’s memoir of how she grew up with Asperger’s syndrome, and how working with a family of gorillas (as an assistant at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle) helped her connect with her own humanity.

Mary Ann Gwinn: 206-464-2357 or mgwinn@seattletimes.com