A selection of new titles by Washington authors, or of local interest.

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“Sentenced to Die”

by J.A. Jance (Morrow, $21.95). Three of the Seattle writer’s paperback-original J.P. Beaumont mysteries from the 1980s, “Until Proven Guilty,” “Injustice for All” and “Trial by Fury,” are gathered together in hardcover. Times staffer Don Duncan, in a 1987 profile of Jance, noted that the books are “laced with enough familiar places to delight any Puget Sounder.”



“Balls! Six Rules for Winning Today’s Business Game”

by Alexi Venneri (Wiley, $19.95). Tips from the former director of guest relations for the Mariners and erstwhile handler of marketing for the Greater Victoria Visitors and Convention Bureau. Venneri is now involved with Kirkland-based Who’s Calling, a business-consulting firm.



“Best Garden Plants for Washington and Oregon”

by Marianne Binetti and Don Williamson (Lone Pine, $15.95). Just in time for gardening season: information on 329 plants that do well in our corner of the country.

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“Summit Routes: Washington’s 100 Highest Peaks”

by Scott Stephenson and Brian Bongiovanni (Alpen Books Press, $19.95). Two Seattle writer-climbers suggest “routes for hikers, scramblers and climbers” that’ll put you on top of the world.



“Beyond Gorp: Favorite Foods from Outdoor Experts”

by Yvonne Prater and Ruth Dyar Mendenhall with Kerry I. Smith (Mountaineers, $15.95). Recipes with input from the likes of Tim Cahill, Jim Whittaker and other outdoors types on alternative fare on the hiking trail. Co-authors Prater and Smith are from Ellensburg and Bainbridge Island, respectively.



“The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven” and “Reservation Blues”

by Sherman Alexie (Grove, both $13). Reissues of the Seattle writer’s 1993 story collection (with two new stories and a new introduction) and 1995 novel. Former Times book editor Donn Fry found “a grim, understated humor” in “Lone Ranger,” the story collection, while his comment on “Reservation Blues,” the novel, was that Alexie depicted “an emotional landscape that Native American readers will find powerfully authentic and non-native readers will find as convincing as it is disturbing.”



“Gorgon: The Monsters That Ruled the Planet Before Dinosaurs and How They Died in the Greatest Catastrophe in Earth’s History”

by Peter D. Ward (Penguin, $15). Paperback reprint of a book on the 250-million-year-old Permian extinction, by a University of Washington professor of geological sciences. Times staffer Bruce Ramsey enthused that Ward “is as good at writing as he is at identifying old bones.”

Michael Upchurch, Seattle Times book critic