See which Education Lab stories made our most-read list from 2015 -- and tell us a story that you found especially memorable or interesting.

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Education Lab spent 2015 talking to parents, teachers, students, school administrators and advocates to identify promising approaches in education practices throughout the state.

Now that the year is winding down, we want to share again Education Lab’s top stories (based on the number of page views they received) and invite you to share a story that you found most memorable or interesting this year.

We look forward to writing more stories in 2016 that highlight the challenges and successes that our education community in Washington faces every day.

Without further ado, here are this year’s top Education Lab stories beginning with the most-read story.

1: Stunning surge in graduation rate as Rainier Beach gamble pays off

Students gathered for an assembly at Rainier Beach High School in February. The school has won a state School of Distinction award. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)
Students gathered for an assembly at Rainier Beach High School in February. The school has won a state School of Distinction award. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

 

2: UW tops new list of best western universities

Image concept courtesy of UW.
Image concept courtesy of UW.

3: Which college or university tops the list of median wages after graduation? Hint: Not the UW

The state community college system’s popular and growing program of applied baccalaureate degrees credited with lifting salaries of graduates.  (Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times)
The state community college system’s popular and growing program of applied baccalaureate degrees credited with lifting salaries of graduates. (Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times)

4: Bellevue schools teach emotional smarts to help boost academic success

From left, students Daniel John, Joy Li and Anni Suokko work through steps on how to handle unwanted behaviors. It’s part of a lesson in Dan Sakaue’s fifth-grade class at Cherry Crest Elementary School in Bellevue. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)
From left, students Daniel John, Joy Li and Anni Suokko work through steps on how to handle unwanted behaviors. It’s part of a lesson in Dan Sakaue’s fifth-grade class at Cherry Crest Elementary School in Bellevue. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

5: Race dramatically skews discipline, even in elementary school

A kindergarten class listens to Spokane psychologist Natalie Turner speak at West Seattle Elementary School recently. Amid statewide worries about discipline, the school is training teachers on understanding the neurological effects of trauma on behavior. (Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times)
A kindergarten class listens to Spokane psychologist Natalie Turner speak at West Seattle Elementary School recently. Amid statewide worries about discipline, the school is training teachers on understanding the neurological effects of trauma on behavior. (Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times)

6: ‘You are more than your mistakes’: Teachers get at roots of bad behavior

Kindergarten teacher Cassie Beck comforts a student having a tough day at Bemiss Elementary in Spokane. The school has adopted a trauma-informed approach that can work with all students and has sharply cut problem behaviors. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Kindergarten teacher Cassie Beck comforts a student having a tough day at Bemiss Elementary in Spokane. The school has adopted a trauma-informed approach that can work with all students and has sharply cut problem behaviors. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)

7: It’s not you, it’s the math: Colleges rethink what students need

Student tutor Angie Foster, right, helps student Krystal Huffman with a math problem at Big Bend Community College in Moses Lake, which offers learn-at-your-own-pace math classes, called “emporium math.” (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)
Student tutor Angie Foster, right, helps student Krystal Huffman with a math problem at Big Bend Community College in Moses Lake, which offers learn-at-your-own-pace math classes, called “emporium math.” (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

8: Brain scans show dyslexia, dysgraphia require different types of treatment

(Donna Grethen / Op Art)
(Donna Grethen / Op Art)

9: How a diverse yet divided school blended ‘segregated’ classes

Kindergartners Delawndra Rogers, left, and Lois Busby share a desk in Danielle Guzman’s K-1 class at Leschi Elementary School.  (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Kindergartners Delawndra Rogers, left, and Lois Busby share a desk in Danielle Guzman’s K-1 class at Leschi Elementary School. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

Tell us in the comments section which news story most resonated with you this year. It could be something that Education Lab wrote about or anything that related to your own experience with education.

And while we have you reflecting on 2015, consider pitching us your most inspiring, surprising stories related to education for our Ignite Education Lab event coming up in January.