To get eyes on ads, Google jumps into telecom field

In its never-ending pursuit to expand use of the Internet, Google says it intends to begin selling data plans for mobile devices sometime soon. The plan reflects its ongoing efforts to provide Internet service through fiber-optic cables in some markets.

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Buyer of Dendreon lays off 77 Seattle employees

The global drug company that acquired Seattle-based Dendreon’s operations in a bankruptcy sale is laying off 77 employees here, according to a WARN notice received by the state Employment Security Department.

Ikea launches furniture with inbuilt wireless chargers

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Lost that charger again for your cellphone or tablet? Hate sorting heaps of wires to charge various devices? Swedish retailer IKEA might just have the answer — furniture with built-in charging spots, including in bedside tables, lamps and desks. The new collection will be available in Europe and North America from next...

HP’s big deal: Tech giant buys Aruba Networks for $2.7B

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Hewlett-Packard is buying wireless networking company Aruba Networks for about $2.7 billion, in what amounts to HP's first major acquisition since its disastrous purchase of a British software company in 2011. Aruba, based in Sunnyvale, California, makes Wi-Fi networking systems for shopping malls, corporate campuses, hotels and universities. Its business has...

Trekker camera goes on a zipline for Amazon jungle images

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — For its next technological trick, Google will show you what it's like to zip through trees in the Amazon jungle. The images released Monday are the latest addition to the diverse collection of photos supplementing Google's widely used digital maps. The maps' "Street View" option mostly provides panoramic views of cities...

Dot-com deja vu: Nasdaq tops 5,000, approaching record high

NEW YORK (AP) — The last time the Nasdaq was this high, Bill Clinton was president, your Internet connection was probably still dial-up and the iPod, iPhone and iPad didn't exist. Fifteen years later the Nasdaq has again closed above 5,000 and is close to topping its record from the dot-com boom. The index has...